Africa goes to COP21

Lopes Henri
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Africa goes to COP21

n°56 Fourth Quarter 2015

African Geopolitics is not a magazine but a review which takes a quasi-academic and scientific approach to core issues without attempting to be controversial. Although we keep a watchful eye on...

Magazine content

Ifo Suspense Averti
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DEFORESTATION: LESSONS TO BE LEARNED FROM THE CONGO BASIN

The deforestation and degradation of the forests have a powerful impact on climate and are behind the implementation of a new economic incentive instrument adopted at the 13th Conference of the Parties (COP13) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change held in Bali in 2007. This mechanism was initially restricted to deforestation alone. It was expanded to include forest degradation, designated by the acronym REDD (Reducing Emissions related to Deforestation and Forest Degradations) adopted in  Bali.

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MADAGASCAR: SAVING BIODIVERSITY

Madagascar is exposed to recurrent climate risks which are affecting its economy and its population’s living    conditions. The consequences of climate change have been felt for the last 20 years as evidenced by the extended periods of drought, rainfall variability and intensification of cyclones and floods associated with cyclonic disturbances. In submitting its action plan to COP21, the government of Madagascar showed that it was equally concerned with both adaptation to and mitigation of the effects of climate change, two different but complementary approaches. The...

Pougnaud Pierre
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CLIMATE AND TERRITORIES: INTERNATIONAL CHALLENGES, AFRICAN SOLUTIONS

Despite the number of states that it represents –  over a  quarter  of  the  global  community  –  until  now  Africa  has  not really been associated with the collective search for sustainable solutions to the problems caused by climate disruption. It is paradoxical, but in many ways significant, that COP17 held in Durban•1  in November and December 2011, despite taking place in Africa, resulted in a widely criticised – and rightly so – agreement because of its minimalist and frankly retrogressive...

Tchamou Blandine Olive
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AFRICA, CLIMATE AND CIVIL SOCIETY

The Conference of the Parties (COP) has always been broadly open to civil society. The first of its kind, held in Berlin in 1995, included the participation of 176 NGOs. Over subsequent meetings the number rose, with 1750 attending COP20 in Lima. Before the drastic security measures made necessary by the attacks of 13 November in Paris, the accreditation given to civil society for this COP21 suggested that a new participation record would be set as its representatives were due to account for half of the 40,000 expected  participants.

Juvin Hervé
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AT COP21, LET US ALSO PRESERVE THE DIVERSITY OF THE PEOPLES

Interview with Hervé Juvin. What is at stake for Africa and for the emerging countries in general at COP21? The stakes of this COP21 are both vital and marginal for Africa. Africa is still the continent with the greatest number of internal migrations. The current demographic explosion will speed up the phenomenon: less populated than Europe in 1970, Africa will have three or four times as many inhabitants as Europe by  2040!

BERG Eugène
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HOW IS AFRICA PARTICIPATING IN THE GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE NEGOTIATION

Africa is already the continent most affected by climate  change. While all the developing countries together are  responsible for only 7%  of  greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, Africa’s proportion is even lower, around 2%, yet the developing countries, those  in Africa particularly, must undergo 75% of the effects of climate change. Among the most vulnerable are, first of all, Madagascar•1, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Ethiopia and Malawi. Many areas like the Sahel-Sahara belt are feeling the effects along with their stream of geopolitical consequences: ...

Boutin Christophe
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FROM PARIS TO MARRAKECH, THE EXAMPLE OF THE MOROCCAN TRANSITION

As the highest authority of the United Nations Framework Convention on  Climate Change (UNFCCC), the  Conference  of the Parties (COP) is responsible for its implementation, in particular assessing the impacts of measures taken by various parties. After France, which is the host in Paris of the 21st Conference of the Parties to an agreement involving 195 countries, it will be the turn of Morocco to host the 22nd  COP next year in Marrakech.

Fanucchi Bruno
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CÔTE D’IVOIRE, MALI AND BURKINA FASO HAVE COME A LONG WAY!

These three key West African countries have had a narrow escape: Côte d’Ivoire, like its two northern neighbours – Mali and Burkina Faso – have come a long way after undergoing serious political upheaval. As far as they are concerned, the worst of the storm seems to have passed and life is returning to normal, despite the very serious alerts in Mali, linked to the persistence of the terrorist threat, with three attacks in March, August and November 2015. Their main asset for the future is their extraordinary numbers of young people. So let us review the situation of...

Gautier François
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BUT WHY IS INDIA SO INTERESTED IN AFRICA?

“I declare this 3rd India-Africa Summit open.” The Indian prime minister Narendra Modi had made no attempt to conceal his pride when he symbolically lit the Hindu candelabra with its five branches on 26 October, under the attentive gaze of 40 African heads of state  and ministers. A record 44 heads of state and government of the 52 countries invited came to Delhi from 26 to 29 October for the biggest meeting of its kind in India in over 30 years. It was attended by the King of Morocco, Mohammed VI, as a guest of  honour,  accompanied by a delegation of 400 people,...

Fekih Adel
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“THE TUNISIAN EXCEPTION” ACKNOWLEDGED BY THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE 2015

The Nobel Peace Prize 2015 awarded on 9 October to the Quartet conducting the national dialogue in Tunisia since 2013  marked an unequivocal acknowledgement of the success of Tunisia’s transition model. Beyond the institutions composing this Quartet (employers, trade unions, the Order of lawyers and the Human Rights League), it serves to recognise Tunisian civil society as a whole as the chief vector of the expression of popular views and of the Tunisian “exception”. Above all, this award is a recognition of the continuous fight of a people for its dignity and the...