Charles Zorgbibe

Zorgbibe Charles

Professor at Paris I University-Panthéon-Sorbonne

Biographie de Zorgbibe Charles

Lawyer and historian of international relations

Professor at the University of Paris I-Pantheon-Sorbonne, Charles Zorgbibe will direct the third round of international relations-diplomacy. He was Dean of the Faculty of Law, Paris-Sud, then rector of the Academy of Aix-Marseille. He led the Foundation for Defense Studies and written for the Department of Defense, several reports on the future of the European Union and UN.

He is the author of numerous tests of public law and political science, as well as biographies, including Wilson, a crusader in the White House.

Ses articles

GIDE IN THE CONGO

n°52 Third Quarter 2014

“A youthful project achieved in maturity”. When he set off for Africa, André Gide was bold enough to compare himself with Curtius, the young Roman hero who sacrificed himself to the infernal gods by hurling himself, fully armed, into the abyss that had opened up in the middle of the Forum! In fact, he was fascinated by Joseph Conrad, whom he had met fifteen years earlier, at the instigation of Valéry Larbaud. He had translated Conrad’s story entitled “...

THE UN-AFRICA PARTNERSHIP

n°51 Second Quarter 2014

The panorama of Africa’s partnerships with the rest of the world would not be complete if we did not mention its relationship with the United Nations. A belated partnership: when the United Nations founding conference opened in San Francisco on 25 April 1945, only four of the 51 founding States were African: South Africa, which was still a “White” dominion of the Commonwealth; Egypt, still at that time ruled by King Farouk amid intermittent tension with Britain, with its...

IN FAVOUR OF A NEW BANDUNG

n°50 First Quarter 2014

The most important event since the Renaissance,” according to Léopold Sédar Senghor, an assembly of the “despised, insulted, dispossessed, oppressed of the human race,” according to the black writer Richard Wright: the Afro-Asian Conference which opened on 18 April 1955 at Bandung (Indonesia) marked an indisputable turning point in the history of the world. 

BRAZZAVILLE, 1988: THE END OF THE COLD WAR IN SOUTHERN AFRICA

n°49 Fourth Quarter 2013

What an astonishing destiny the “land of the Namas and Hereros,” a possession of Imperial Germany from 1884 to 1915, has had! To the west, a semi-desert territory, the Namib desert, one of the most absolute desert areas in the world; to the east, the reddish sands of the Kalahari; a central plateau bordered by steeply- rising mountains, which covers half the country; and lastly, almost non-existent vegetation 

“HENRY OF ARABIA”: THE KISSINGER METHOD AND EGYPT

n°48 Third Quarter 2013

The special relationship between the United States and Egypt was born in 1973, during the presidency of Richard Nixon when Henry Kissinger was Secretary of State. It still exists today, forty years later, amid the turmoil and reversals of the Egyptian revolution.

FROM THE PAN-AFRICAN MESSAGE TOWARDS A CONTINENTAL ORGANISATION

n°47 Second Quarter 2013

The African Union was born on 26 May 2001, one month after the ratification of its Constitutive Act by two-thirds — i.e. thirty-six States — of the members of the old continental organisation, the Organisation of African Unity (OAU). The Conference of African Heads of State and Government, which met from 9 to 11 July 2001 at Lusaka (Zambia), was the last OAU “Summit.” In its current form, the African Union has come a long way from the rough proposal presented by Colonel...

African security: a new order ?

n°46 First Quarter 2013

Could it be that the consensus on the intervention in Mali is about to be broken in France, even though it is apparently being maintained as far as international opinion is concerned? The former French Ambassador to Dakar, Jean-Christophe Rufin, who was a well- known analyst of international relations before becoming a famous novelist, has put the socialist government on its guard against the “deadly sins” that it might commit. The watchword of “war against terrorism”...

The Emerging Powers and the International System

n°45 Fourth Quarter 2012

According   to   Paul   Robert’s   alphabetical   and   analogical dictionary, to emerge is “appear above the surface of the water” and in the figurative sense, “to manifest oneself, to appear, to appear more clearly.” So the emerging States are appearing on the international stage like those emergent rays “that come out of an environment after passing through it.” Let us point out that the...

The Francophone world: a baroque orchestra?

n°44 Third Quarter 2012

The  novelist  Pierre-Jean  Rémy  compared  the  Francophone cultural space to a baroque orchestra, where each player has an equal role, corresponding to that of his instrument, without a leader or a first violin. In fact, as in the heyday of baroque music, “you can take a melody from here, a variation from there, without some officious censor crying foul, claiming plagiarism.” Dean Chevrette, of the Law Faculty of Montréal, although as a...

KISSINGER, CHINA AND THE WORLD

n°43 Second Quarter 2012

In Diplomacy, his written testament that is also a manifesto for the post-Cold  War  period,  Henry  Kissinger,  formerly  National Security  Adviser,  then  Secretary  of  State  in  the  Nixon-Ford administration, extolled China as a model pupil of the Republican diplomacy that he had devised in the 1970s with Richard Nixon: according to him, only China had “played the game” in relation to the American plan for...